Cybersecurity is a behavior, not a skill

Book Release date October 20, 2020
Well Aware: Master the Nine Cybersecurity Habits to Protect Your Future examines our security challenges using lessons learned from psychology, neuroscience, history, and economics. This books is for anyone who wants to protect themselves online . . . particularly for leaders who need to protect their organizations.
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Well Aware: Master the Nine Cybersecurity Habits to Protect Your Future

Key Strategies to safeguard your future .

Cybersecurity isn’t just one thing – there are nine separate habits that govern how you interact with others through technology. To improve our cybersecurity outcomes, we need to master the nine cybersecurity habits to protect our future.
Security professionals will tell you there are three parts to security: people, processes, and technology. But people are the ones who write and employ processes. People are the ones who create and use technology. It shouldn’t be surprising to learn, then, that people are the cause of nearly 95 percent of all cybersecurity incidents.
Cybersecurity relies on a coordinated effort across all teams – but especially HR and IT.

Who is responsible for cybersecurity ?

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The threat of cybercrime and the need for increased security is only occasionally discussed at board level in 54% of businesses.

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65% of businesses say cybersecurity needs to be discussed more at senior management level.

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31% of employees receive cyber training and education on an annual basis.

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31% say the responsibility ultimately sits with the CEO

SOURCE: RSM GLOBAL KEY FINDINGS, 2019 CHUBB CYBER RISJ SURVEY

SECURITY IS NOT ABOUT TECHNOLOGY, IT’S ABOUT PEOPLE

The Nine Cybersecurity Habits To Protect Your Future .

Security isn’t a skill or something that you’re born with. Security is a behavior, and there are nine different habits that work together to help protect you when using technology.

1. Literacy

There is an element of security that involves understanding your environment. This involves continuous learning,

2. Skepticism

Being a skeptic means not trusting something until you've established its credibility.

3. Vigilance

This is the state of mind for keeping watch so that when you see something, you can be ready to recognize and act.

4. Secrecy

To protect your digital assets, you need to know what they are and you need to understand why you're protecting them.

7. Community

You need help to be secure. We work together to solve problems.

5. Culture

Security doesn't happen in a vacuum, it requires everyone to participate in the form of practices, routines, and traditions.

8. Mirroring

You want to be able to see your digital self and what you look like from someone else's perspective.

6. Diligence

After you experience an incident, you need to have plans and protocols for handing how you prepare and respond.

9. Deception

Deception can be both a preventative control as well as a detective one.

Security is in Your DNA .

As a social animal, we came together as a species for mutual protection, and we’ve evolved to have a natural desire to want to play a role in security. And whether we come together in our families, communities, or organizations, we need security in order to perform at our highest and reach our full potential as individuals.​

As humans, we have the unique ability to understand how our own minds work, and then we can change our own minds from the outside in. We must understand not just the technical aspects of security but also the psychology and neuroscience behind it. Security is not a competency; it is a behavior. Behaviors can’t be changed overnight, but they can be changed.​

There is a way to improve human security. It starts with changing one habit at a time.

When we train people to be secure, we show them how to set up a pin on their mobile phone or how not to click on links in email. But when a new technology comes out, they need to come back to us for more training because they were given a fish, not taught how to fish.
As humans, we have the unique ability to understand how our own minds work, and then we can change our own minds from the outside in. We must understand not just the technical aspects of security but also the psychology and neuroscience behind it. Security is not a competency; it is a behavior. Behaviors can’t be changed overnight, but they can be changed.

Hard Cover Book Release
October 20, 2020

WELL AWARE: MASTER THE NINE CYBERSECURITY HABITS TO PROTECT YOUR FUTURE. EARLY BOOK REVIEWS

"Well Aware shows you don’t need a degree in computer science to safeguard your community. George Finney’s nine cybersecurity habits make protecting yourself online approachable for anyone.”

—Daniel H. Pink, New York Times Bestselling author of When, Drive, and To Sell Is Human

“George Finney has written a must-read primer for anyone who wants to protect themselves online . . . particularly for leaders who need to protect their organizations. With this book, you can learn from one of the best.”

—Robert Glazer, best-selling author of Elevate, Friday Forward, and Performance Partnerships

“George has documented an incredibly practical and holistic overview of the foundational elements of cybersecurity practice and business in general. Definitely worth the read.”

— Stuart McClure, former CEO of Cylance and author of Hacking Exposed
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Well Aware . Companion Guide Roadmap to Success

Take a closer look at the nine habits found in the Well Aware: Master the Nine Cybersecurity Habits to Protect Your Future book by downloading the companion guide.

Humans are creatures of habits, and it is in this power of habits that Finney sees the opportunity to advance our learning and engagement as workers, citizens, and consumers, and to develop patterns of behaviors that will improve our security posture.